Toyota Ghana to adopt Korle-Bu Renal Unit

Toyota Ghana to adopt Korle-Bu Renal Unit

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By Cecil MENSAH

Automobile giant, Toyota Ghana Company Limited, is considering the idea of adopting the Renal Unit of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH), the country’s premier referral hospital, in Accra.

The idea came about when management of the company visited the unit to present a cheque of GHC5,000 for the treatment of Madam Gifty Larbi, who hails from Begoro in the Eastern Region.

This was in response to a request by the Forum for Kidney Patients, seeking assistance for the treatment of their member, Madam Larbi. The forum has a membership of 250 at Korle-Bu, Police Hospital and in the Tema area.

Madam Larbi has been suffering from kidney disorders for the past five years and has been undergoing dialysis at the unit.

Dr Eric Dako, Executive Director of Toyota Ghana Company Limited, said his company believes in improving the health status of people because when the people are healthy they can work to improve the development of the nation.

It is in view of this that, “we have over the years supported both individuals and organizations in the area of health.

“We recently made a donation of some air conditions and television sets to the plastic surgery unit here at Korle-Bu to help patients, who are recovering from the unit, feel comfortable in their various wards,” he said.

He also said kidney impairment and renal failure are critical issues that require a lot of attention and called for preventive education to stem its increase in the country.

He took the opportunity to commend the Association for making efforts to seek sponsorship for its members.

He was hopeful the amount will help offset the medical bills of Madam Larbi and promised to later top it up with additional GHC5,000.

He indicated that his company is considering adopting the Renal Unit to provide more support to ensure patients are properly treated at the unit.

He urged patients to not only depend on their treatments but ensure a good dietary practice to facilitate their healing process.

Meanwhile, Renal Unit needs more support from corporate organisations to enable it better treat kidney impairment patients in the country.

The unit will apply some of the aid in expanding its facilities.

Dr Vincent Boahema, the head of the Renal Unit, says pressure on the facility is highly delaying the process of treatment for patients.

He therefore called on corporate organizations to adopt the unit like others have done for the cardiothoracic centre of the hospital to facilitate better treatment of patients.

According to him, patients are suffering when it comes to the payment for their treatment at the Renal Unit.

He said because of the excessive pressure on the facilities at the unit, three of the 12 dialysis machines have broken down and have since not been repaired.

He said the situation is so because large numbers of patients from across the country visit the facility on daily basis to have treatment for kidney related diseases.

He indicated that the unit is in dire need of air conditioners at the lobby of the unit to provide a better healthcare atmosphere for family and friends of patients.

He said the situation, as it stands, has become a major source of concern for the management of the unit at the hospital.

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